Exercise should be standard part of cancer care, says new report


The Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs) has welcomed the publication of a report advising all cancer patients to exercise for at least two and a half hours a week.

The report published by Macmillan Cancer Support says advice to rest and take it easy after treatment is an outdated view.

REPs Registrar Jean-Ann Marnoch said: “This report confirms what we, as exercise professionals, have known for a long time – that regular exercise has far-reaching long-term health benefits regardless of most other conditions someone may be facing.

“For the past five years we have been working with SkillsActive (the sector skills council for the active leisure industry), doctors, medical charities and healthcare professionals to ensure fitness instructors are properly qualified to work with patients with chronic conditions like cancer.

“Indeed, SkillsActive has just written qualification standards for cancer rehabilitation, meaning specialist training courses can now be produced for those members wanting to make the move to level 4 Specialist Instructor status.”

Macmillan’s report, Move More, says that of the two million cancer survivors in theUK, around 1.6 million are not physically active enough.

Adult cancer patients and cancer survivors should undertake 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week, the reports says, which, is in-line with Department of Health guidelines.

Ciaran Devane, chief executive of Macmillan Cancer Support, said physical activity was very important to the survival and recovery process. She said: “Cancer patients would be shocked if they knew just how much of a benefit physical activity could have on their recovery and long term health, in some cases reducing their chances of having to go through the gruelling ordeal of treatment all over again.”

For a full story visit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-14417084

11 responses to “Exercise should be standard part of cancer care, says new report

  1. There should be more done to keep in patients active too. The elderly, especially, degrade so fast if left to just lie in bed for a few weeks. It wouldn’t take much and a lot of it can be done in bed.

  2. Although important, exercise on its own is probably not enough and should go hand in hand with a healthy diet. The scientific evidence indicates that exercise helps prevent breast cancer, at least in part, by lowering insulin levels in the body. Since eating sugary foods raises insulin levels, a poor diet may undo any of the benefits achieved by more exercise.

  3. In some countries exercise is part of culture.
    Some foreign business rewards itself promoting gentle exercise to staff for continued health and well-being.
    Sitting at a desk all day can be just as unhealthy as standing all day.
    In my opinion, UK employees are slaves.

    Health care is not a problem if employees are considered “self employed” or “underemployed” hours.
    If it breaks just get a new one.

  4. When you see film of recovering servicemen & the effort they put into recovery from massive injury, you can see whats possible.

    Often, people make the excuse they are too ill to exert themselves, for many, this is rubbish & laziness.

    Treatments should come with an obligation to complete a recovery activity course, which should be agreed before treatment, otherwise the treatment is wasted.

  5. Interesting idea this. Last week it was people over 5′ 0″ who posed the greatest risk, the week before it was women who sat down for 4 hours a day.

    I must pop around to my neighbour, who is barely 5’6″, and who went for long walks after treatment, mowed the lawn regularly, and even cut the neighbours hedges.

    His treatment has been stopped, and currently has Macmillian nurses attending.

  6. I can only assume that anyone who comes out with this type of advice has never gone through the physical and emotional roller coaster that is cancer diagnosis and treatment. It is patronising and assumes all cancer patients have somehow contributed to their illness and ignores all the slim; exercising; non-smoking; sensible eating and drinking folk who have had a cancer diagnosis.

  7. This sounds very good in theory. A friend was diagnosed in March and physio was recommended during her treatment. She had the first session a week ago! It was treated with no importance at all by her doctor. She now has Priority status. If not there would have been a further very long wait. So a very good idea, but the professionals need to be together in providing it.

  8. When you see film of recovering servicemen & the effort they put into recovery from massive injury, you can see whats possible.

    Often, people make the excuse they are too ill to exert themselves, for many, this is rubbish & laziness.

    Treatments should come with an obligation to complete a recovery activity course, which should be agreed before treatment, otherwise the treatment is wasted.

  9. The way things are, UK/USA/EUR are less able to afford our massive healthcare costs.
    Those provided with treatments should be more responsible. I see little point in providing expensive treatments to those who refuse to work hard at recovery and progression of improvement of damaging lifestyles.

    Effort can be painful & no pain = no gain.

    Not all can do, but MANY can.

  10. I have recently finished chemotherapy and radiotherapy and I absolutely agree with saying you should exercise. Yes, the treatment and trying to do everyday things is hard work and exhausting, I made myself go out for a walk of at least 45 minutes almost every day (even when I felt dreadful and had to drag myself round) I would certainly say it has paid off and helped me to cope with the treatment.

  11. Ken

    Exercise and a positive attitude to life are must haves to get through what are tough times. starting off with exercising in a chair and building yourself up is one way it can be done I don’t think anyone is saying that we should be running a marathon.
    there are people out there who can help but it takes a good bit of digging. as usual our politicians cannot see past the end of their noses Sid

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